Thursday, 3 June 2010

Breadchick Mary's Dark Onion Rye - a Bread Baking Babes Rewind

Killer. A harsh word, to be sure, but it is fitting.
I have killed. Through benign neglect, true, but the results still end in death.
My beloved sourdough starter, Peter, has succumbed to mould due to hot weather and my forgetfulness. Usually if I forget about him he just tends to get a little alcoholic, but with our unseasonable heatwave he has developed an unhealthy fuzz and ended up in the city compost program. RIP Peter.
Before he passed we had one last blast together, last week we baked up Breadchick Mary's Dark Onion Rye. A delicious, dark bread with an old country taste and texture. Wonderful toasted with sharp, old cheddar. Mary includes a tutorial for building a starter - looks like I'm going back to school. What shall I name the next one?

Breadchick’s Dark Onion Rye
The Sour Dough
Breadchick Mary

Total Time for Recipe: 2 days (does not include the time needed to build a starter)
Results in one (1) boule

Day 1: You will feed your starter 2 times on the first day; once in the morning and once about 2 - 4 hour prior to making the sponge.

First Feeding: Stir in any hooch and DO NOT TOSS ANY OFF. Feed the starter 1/2 cup water and 1/2 cup AP flour.

Second Feeding: Stir in any hooch and divide the starter into two equal parts. Put one part away (This is your Mother Starter) and feed the other part 1/2 cup water and 1/2 cup AP flour. Wait 2 - 4 hours and then make the sponge. (Note: I make the sponge right before I go to bed as it needs about 8 hours of fermenting time)

In large bowl combine
1 cup active starter
3/4 cup rye flour
3/4 cup Bread flour (12% + gluten)
1/2 cup water

Cover and let ferment 8 - 10 hours overnight

Making the Dough:
You can use a stand mixer or do this by hand.

Combine:
Sponge
1 1/2 Tbsp dark molasses (or if you can’t find molasses, use Treacle or 1 Tbsp Lyle syrup and 1 Tbsp strong dark coffee) Note: don’t use Blackstrap molasses as this will give the bread a bitter taste.
2 Tbsp honey
2 Tbsp melted unsalted butter
and mix until smooth.
To sponge mixture add:
1 3/4tsp salt
1 1/2 Tbsp freeze dried or sweated fresh onions
2 heaping tsp caraway seeds (optional)
1 cup Dark Rye or Pumpernickel flour (100% Rye flour)
1/2 cup bread flour
Note: Use 3/4 cup of rye flour and 3/4 cup of bread flour if using European rye flour

Mix on low speed until a shaggy wet dough is formed.
In a separate bowl, whisk together 1/2 cup dark rye, 1/2 cup medium rye, and 1/2 cup bread flour. Using the dough hook of your stand mixer, on low speed, add rye flour mixture to shaggy dough 1/2 cup at a time until dough forms ball that pulls away from the bowl and is firm but still slightly tacky to the touch.

If you are doing this by hand, the dough ball will be firm and smooth but will stick your hand if you squeeze the dough.

On a floured counter (I use medium rye flour to flour the counter), give the dough a few hand kneads (about 2 - 4 minutes) and let rest for 15 minutes. Give one last knead, dough should be elastic feeling and not stick to your hands but will feel tacky. If it sticks to your hands, knead in additional rye flour until dough is firm but ever so slightly tacky.
In large, lightly greased covered bowl, let dough rise until almost double, about 4 hours.

Forming the loaf:
This bread works best if formed into a large round loaf. Gently deflate risen dough and gather into a boule. Place, pucker side up, in a very well floured brotform or banneton and loosely cover. Let rise until dough fills form and rises slightly above.
If you don’t have brotform or banneton, you can improvise by placing a very well floured tea towel in a large colander or other large round dish.

Baking the Bread:
Preheat oven to 400 degrees. If using a stone or tiles, pre heat the oven with the stone/tiles in the oven. Gently unmold risen loaf onto a flat baking sheet prepared with cornmeal dusted parchment paper or onto a cornmeal prepared peel. You may slash the loaf is you wish. Mist top of loaf with water and gently slide bread into the oven and bake at 400 for 20 minutes. Turn oven down to 375 degrees and bake for another 25 minutes or until inside temperature of loaf reaches 200 degrees.

Let bread cool for 4 - 6 hours before slicing. This is very important as rye breads will turn to a gummy mess if they are sliced before completely cool.

Breadchick’s Sourdough Starter or Training Wheels Sourdough Starter
The Sour Dough
Breadchick Mary

Starter Recipe: All in ingredients should be room temperature
You will need both rye and unbleached all purpose flour for this starter.

1 cup warm water, 80 - 90 degrees
1 cup room temperature rye flour
1 pinch yeast
1 pinch sugar

Combine ingredients in new 1 quart ziplock container with lid or large wide mouth glass Ball jar. What every you store it in, you want it to be easy to feed it and pour it off with a wide mouth. Loosely fit lid on container and let sit 12 hours in warm place.

First Day Feeding:
Toss off 1/2 of the starter. Feed starter with 1 cup warm water and 1 cup rye flour, stirring until combined. Don’t worry about lumps. Let sit in warm place for 12 hours. Stir in any hooch (the clear liquid on top of starter) and toss off 1/2 of starter. Feed with 1 cup warm water and 1 cup rye flour, stirring until combined. Let sit in warm place for 12 hours. Starter should be bubbly and frothy about 2 hours after each feeding.

Second Day Feeding:
Toss off 1/2 of the starter. Feed starter with 1/2 cup warm water and 1/2 cup rye flour, stirring until combined. Don’t worry about lumps. Let sit in warm place for 12 hours. Stir in any hooch *clear liquid on top of starter* and toss off 1/2 of starter. Feed with 1/2 cup warm water and 1/2 cup rye flour, stirring until combined. Let sit in warm place for 12 hours. Starter should be bubbly and frothy about 2 hours after each feeding and smell like vinegar

Third Day Feeding:
Toss off 1/2 of the starter. Feed starter with 1/2 cup warm water and 1/8 cup rye flour and 3/8 cup All Purpose flour, stirring until combined. Don’t worry about lumps. Let sit in warm place for 12 hours. Stir in any hooch *clear liquid on top of starter* and toss off 1/2 of starter. Feed starter with 1/2 cup warm water and 1/8 cup rye flour and 3/8 cup All Purpose flour, stirring until combined. Let sit in warm place for 12 hours. Starter should be bubbly and frothy about 2 hours after each feeding and smell like vinegar

Fourth Day Feeding:
Toss off 1/2 of the starter. Feed starter with 1/2 cup warm water and 1/2 All Purpose flour, stirring until combined. Don’t worry about lumps. Let sit in warm place for 12 hours. Stir in any hooch *clear liquid on top of starter* and toss off 1/2 of starter. Feed starter with 1/2 cup warm water and 1/2cup All Purpose flour, stirring until combined. Let sit in warm place for 12 hours. Starter may be bubbly and frothy about 2 hours after each feeding or may not and smell like pickled vegetables or strong vinegar.
Do not worry if the starter isn’t as bubbly as it was the first three days. This is normal for the 4 - 6th day of this starter’s life. As long as the starter isn’t strange colors like orange, pink, or green and doesn’t smell like dead fish or wet gym socks you are fine.

Day 5 - 7 Feeding: Follow Day Four feedings

Day 8 Feeding:
Toss off 1/2 of the starter. Feed starter with 1/2 cup warm water and 1/2 All Purpose flour, stirring until combined. Don’t worry about lumps. Let sit in warm place for 12 hours. Stir in any hooch *clear liquid on top of starter* and toss off 1/2 of starter. Feed starter with 1/2 cup warm water and 1/2cup All Purpose flour, stirring until combined. Let sit in warm place for 12 hours. Starter will be begin to be very bubbly and frothy about 2 hours after each feeding again and smell and taste very sour.

After Day 8, you can use it to bake and cook with. I suggest starting with pancakes and quick breads that don’t require big rises.

Day 9 - Day 15 feeding:
Toss off 1/2 of the starter. Feed starter with 1/2 cup warm water and 1/2 All Purpose flour, stirring until combined. Don’t worry about lumps. Let sit in warm place for 24 hours.

After Day 15 you should be able to make bread with the starter. If at any time during day 8 - 15 you notice any off smells or off colors (pink, green, orange, blue) or any mold. Throw away the starter, sterilize container and start over. If you notice the starter turning gray and lots of hooch, go back to 2X a day feedings for 2 days and then back to 1X a day feedings.

Day 16 - 20 feedings:
Toss off 1/2 of the starter. Feed starter with 1/2 cup warm water and 1/2 All Purpose flour, stirring until combined. Don’t worry about lumps. Let sit in warm place for 24 hours.

After Day 20 you can put the starter in the fridge until you are ready to bake or cook with it. This is called a “Dormant Starter”. We’ll talk about baking with a dormant starter in a later post. First, let’s get you going on having a starter on your counter, OK?
If at any time you have any questions or are wondering if your starter is doing OK, drop me an email and we’ll talk about what is going on! If you want to send me pictures, please compress them.

With that said, Ladies and Gentleman…. Start Your Starters!!